Why Is My Money Plant Leggy? [FIND OUT!]

Money plants are popular houseplants because they are easy to grow and quite interesting to watch, but it can be frustrating when your money plant does not grow as you expect it to.

A leggy money plant is usually the result of problems with temperature or lighting, but it could also be caused by under or over-watering. Here are some common causes of leggy money plants, along with ways to fix them and make your money plant thrive again.

One of the most common reasons for a leggy money plant is a lack of sunlight. If your plant is not getting enough light, it will start to stretch out in search of a light source.

This can cause the stems to become weak and leggy. Another reason for legginess could be over-watering. If you are watering your plant too often, the roots will not get enough oxygen and the plant will start to stretch out in search of air.

Leggy money plants are a common problem, but there are a few things you can do to fix them.

First, make sure your plant is getting enough light. If it’s not, move it to a brighter spot.

Second, cut back on watering. Allow the soil to dry out between watering.

Third, fertilize your plant with a half-strength fertilizer solution every two weeks. Fourth, repot your plant in fresh potting mix.

Finally, if all else fails, you can try propagation.

 Why is My Money Tree Leggy?

One of the most common reasons for a leggy money plant is a lack of sunlight. If your plant is not getting enough light, it will start to stretch out in search of a light source. This can cause the stems to become weak and leggy.

Another reason for legginess could be over-watering. If you are watering your plant too often, the roots will not get enough oxygen and the plant will start to stretch out in search of air.

A third possible reason for legginess could be too much light. If your plant is getting too much sun, it can become leggy and skinny as a result of over-exposure to UV rays.

To fix legginess caused by light exposure, try moving your plant to a less sunny spot or use a grow light if you need more light.

Another common reason for legginess is underwatering. If your plant does not have enough water, it will go into survival mode and use any energy left in its stems to grow a new set of leaves.

Without flowers or fruit, money plants are mainly decorative pieces, so underwatering can make them appear very skinny and leggy as they reach out in search of light. To avoid underwatering, wait until your soil dries out before watering your plant again.

How to Fix Leggy Pilea

If your Pilea is leggy, don’t worry there are a few things you can do to fix the problem! First, make sure that your plant is getting enough light. If it’s not, move it to a brighter spot.

Second, check the temperature of the room if it’s too cold, your plant will become leggy in an attempt to reach the warmth. Third, make sure you’re watering your plant regularly, and evenly over-watering can cause legging as well.

So your Pilea is leggy, but you’ve fixed all of these issues. Now what? Well, if your plant has been leggy for more than a month, it might be time to repot.

Sometimes when you transplant a Pilea (or any other houseplant), they get stressed out and their growth slows down. If your plant hasn’t grown in over two months after repotting, it might be too stressed out to grow again.

 Can You Cut The Top Off Pilea?

Yes, you can cut the top off pilea to help in stimulating the plant’s growth hormones and encourage it to produce new leaves as well as reproduce properly.

Cutting the top off pilea may seem very drastic to you but it is just like deadheading flowers, cutting pilea will encourage new growth in the plant, it is a great way to give an old and stagnant pilea a new boost of life.

The only pilea that should be cut is the matured pilea. Pileas develop a central stalk that begins to harden, before cutting it off ensure the central stalk of the plant is thick enough to sustain life after it must have been cut.

ALSO SEE: Why is my Pilea Falling Over?

Will Pilea Leaves Grow Back?

Yes. Pilea leaves will only grow back if the plant is getting enough light. If your plant is in a low-light spot, try moving it to a brighter location. You can also try increasing the amount of light by adding a grow light.

If your plant is getting enough light and it still doesn’t have any leaves, you are likely overwatered.

Pileas are prone to root rot and will die if they sit in water for too long. Be sure to let your pileas dry out between watering, which should be once every few weeks. Allow the top of the soil to dry before watering again.

Pileas will also shed their leaves if they’re under too much stress. Pileas are native to moist forests but may be stressed if your home is particularly dry or hot.

They also don’t like drafts and can lose their leaves in response to sudden temperature changes.

Pileas are also prone to leaf pests like spider mites. These tiny pests live on a plant’s sap and suck it out of it, leaving brown spots.

You can prevent spider mites by moving your plant away from areas where people often walk or sit, and washing your hands before touching them. Spider mites can spread quickly, so check regularly for signs of infestation and eliminate any you find.

Finally, pileas can become leggy if they’re repotted too early. Pileas do not need to be repotted until their root ball is filled with roots and reaches their soil surface.

If you notice your plant looking like it needs repotting, hold off and let its roots fill out before repotting. Doing so will help your plant stay healthy for longer.

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